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Benjamin Rush papers

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/096
Scope and Contents The collection includes a reply by Benjamin Rush and twelve other Philadelphia physicians, Charles Caldwell, William Dewees, John Redman Coxe, Philip Syng Physick, James Reynolds, Francis Bowes Sayre, John C. Otto, William Boys, Samuel Cooper, James Stuart, Felix Pascalis Ouviere, and Joseph Strong, to inquiry of Thomas Mifflin on 1797 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia. Rush maintains yellow fever is identical with bilious remitting fever of warm climates, discusses source of 1797 outbreak...

Commonplace book

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/122
Scope and Contents Volume of unnamed Charleston physician with alphabetical listing of ailments and prescriptions with reference to physician’s cases or published sources, 1839. Include case report of woman dead in childbirth and accounts of physician’s experiences with yellow fever cases during an outbreak in Charleston during the summer of 1839. Physician describes climatic conditions, symptoms of patients, and general observations. Includes copy of letter, [1839] Sept. 13, summarizing events of outbreak....

Isaac Hiester letter to Samuel Jackson

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/143
Scope and Contents Hiester recalls experience as student sent by Caspar Wistar to Germantown to report on outbreak of yellow fever among several families there, circa 1805. Letter describes physical situation of Germantown and location of houses of infected families.

Joseph Hartshorne letter to Nicholas Chervin

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/038-02
Scope and Contents Chervin, 10 May 1821, requests Hartshorne to relate his experiences and opinion concerning the contagiousness of yellow fever. Hartshorne replies, 22 May 1821, that he can find no evidence for contagiousness and theorizes that yellow fever is tied to excessive summer heat in Philadelphia and mentions his trip to Batavia (1806-1807) where the disease is less violent due to sea breezes. Hartshorne then describes the outbreak of yellow fever in Philadelphia in 1820 and the evacuation of the Water...

Leonard Lawrence notes on the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/083
Scope and Contents Three volumes bound as one containing beginning of Chapman’s lecture course on practice of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Volume 1 concerns description and treatment of fevers, including yellow fever; volume 2, hemorrhages; and volume 3, respiratory diseases, including croup, asthma, and consumption.

Letter from George F. Lehman to Samuel Jackson

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/142
Scope and Contents Letter written by George F. Lehman from the Lazaretto, 14 June 1821, reporting on voyage of London Packet from New Orleans to Philadelphia in 1821 to illustrate non-contagious nature of yellow fever. Lehman describes habits and symptoms of passengers who fell ill with the disease.

Nicholas Chervin papers

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/141
Scope and Contents This collection consists of fifty-seven responses from fifty-six Philadelphia physicians to Chervin's 1821 survey concerning each physician's experiences with and beliefs regarding the contagious nature of yellow fever.

Rene La Roche papers

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/186
Scope and Contents The Rene La Roche papers consist of two collections: one of correspondence, and one of manuscripts. For a more detailed description of the materials, please see the "Scope and Contents" note for each series.

Samuel Coates letter to Joseph Paschall

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/002
Scope and Contents Autograph letter signed from Samuel Coates in Philadelphia to Joseph Paschall, 25 Sept. 1793, describing family matters, Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of 1793, and conditions in city during yellow fever epidemic. Coates lists acquaintances who are recovering, ill, or dead and mentions treating the disease with specific of Benjamin Rush.

Stephen Cheek essay on yellow fever

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 2/103
Scope and Contents "An inaugural essay on yellow fever: presented to the faculty of the Philadelphia College of Medicine for the degree of doctor in medicine" Cheek maintains yellow fever itself is not contagious but communicable only under certain climatic conditions. He then discusses the yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans in 1853 and describes symptoms and possible methods of treatment.